China halts oil product exports to North Korea in November as sanctions bite

China exported no oil products to North Korea in November, Chinese customs data showed, apparently going above in addition to beyond sanctions imposed earlier This particular year by the United Nations in a bid to limit petroleum shipments to the isolated country.

Tensions have flared anew over North Korea’s ongoing nuclear in addition to missile programs, pursued in defiance of years of U.N. resolutions. Last week, the U.N. Security Council imposed fresh caps on trade with North Korea, including limiting oil product shipments to just 500,000 barrels a year.

Beijing also imported no iron ore, coal or lead through North Korea in November, the second full month of the latest trade sanctions imposed by U.N. China, the main source of North Korea’s fuel, did not export any gasoline, jet fuel, diesel or fuel oil to its isolated neighbor last month, data through the General Administration of Customs showed on Tuesday.

November was the second straight month China exported no diesel or gasoline to North Korea. The last time China’s jet fuel shipments to Pyongyang were at zero was in February 2015.

“This particular can be a natural outcome of the tightening of the various sanctions against North Korea,” said Cai Jian, an expert on North Korea at Fudan University in Shanghai. The tightening “reflects China’s stance,” he said.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said she didn’t know any details about the oil products export situation.

“As a principle, China has consistently fully, correctly, conscientiously in addition to strictly enforced relevant U.N. Security Council resolutions on North Korea. We have already established a set of effective operating mechanisms in addition to methods,” she said at a regular briefing on Tuesday, without elaborating.

Since June, state-run China National Petroleum Corp (CNPC) has suspended sales of gasoline in addition to diesel to North Korea, concerned that will that will would likely not get paid for its goods, Reuters previously reported.

Beijing’s move to turn off the taps completely can be rare. In March 2003, China suspended oil supplies to North Korea for three days after Pyongyang fired a missile into waters between the Korean Peninsula in addition to Japan.

that will can be unknown if China still sells crude oil to Pyongyang. Beijing has not disclosed its crude exports to North Korea for several years.

Industry sources say China still supplies about 520,000 tonnes, or 3.8 million barrels, of crude a year to North Korea via an aging pipeline. that will can be a little more than 10,000 barrels a day, in addition to worth about $0 million a year at current prices.

North Korea also sources some of its oil through Russia.

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