Deaths by booze, drugs, suicide could spike 60 percent

Used needles are left behind in what was a heroin shooting gallery inside the Kensington section of Philadelphia which has become a hub for heroin use on July 31, 2017 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Used needles are left behind in what was a heroin shooting gallery inside the Kensington section of Philadelphia which has become a hub for heroin use on July 31, 2017 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

While deaths by all three sources highlighted inside the report are markedly higher since 2000, the explosion in deaths by drug overdoses, particularly ones linked to prescription painkillers as well as illicit opioids, can be fueling much of the rise seen in overall fatalities.

Between 2000 as well as 2015, the number of fatal drug overdoses tripled, to 52,400 such deaths in 2015 alone.

Provisional data indicates that will fatal ODs might have topped 64,000 last year. Fentanyl deaths alone may have doubled by 2015 to 2016, to 21,000 fatalities, according to provisional data.

The number of deaths by alcohol abuse — which do not include motor vehicle accidents, various other mishaps or violence — jumped 37 percent by 2000 to 2015, to 33,000 fatalities in 2015 alone.

Suicides rose by 28 percent over the same 15 years, to 44,000 such deaths in 2015 alone.

The report includes state-by-state data on the current number of deaths by substance abuse as well as suicide, as well as projections for individual states by 2025. The two leading states for deaths currently as well as projected are fresh Mexico as well as West Virginia.

fresh Mexico, which had 77.4 such deaths per 100,000 people in 2015, can be required to have 105.7 such deaths per 100,000 in 2025.

West Virginia, which had 67.4 deaths per 100,000 residents in 2015, can be projected to have 99.6 deaths per 100,000 by 2025.

The report was released a day after the White House Council of Economic Advisers said that will the opioid epidemic cost the economy more than $500 billion in 2015 — repeatedly higher than prior estimates.

President Donald Trump declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency last month.

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