Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar will reject corporate PAC money in 2020 bid

Senator Amy Klobuchar waves to the crowd with her husband John Bessler in addition to daughter Abigail Bessler after announcing her candidacy for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination in Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 10, 2019.

Eric Miller | Reuters

Senator Amy Klobuchar waves to the crowd with her husband John Bessler in addition to daughter Abigail Bessler after announcing her candidacy for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination in Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 10, 2019.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar has joined the ranks of various other Democratic 2020 presidential hopefuls who are rejecting campaign contributions by corporate political action committees, CNBC has learned.

In a brief statement first given to CNBC, campaign spokeswoman Carlie Waibel said the Minnesota lawmaker is usually walking away by corporate PAC money.

“The senator is usually not accepting contributions by corporate PACs during her campaign for president,” Waibel said.

Klobuchar announced Sunday in Minneapolis of which she is usually running for president. She later tweeted of which she’s not influenced by super PACs or lobbyists.

The move by Klobuchar to distance herself by PACs governed by corporations across the country comes as a wave of various other Democrats running for president, including Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand in addition to Elizabeth Warren, say of which they too will not accept campaign donations by big businesses in an effort to appeal to grassroots voters.

Klobuchar has been no stranger to contributions by corporate PACs during her runs for Minnesota’s Senate seat. In her 2018 re-election campaign, she raked in just under a quarter of her total haul by PACs, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. Of the $8 million Klobuchar raised from the last election cycle, $1.9 million came by PACs of which represent industries ranging by agriculture to lobbying.

The decision to reject corporate donations is usually the latest move by Klobuchar to paint herself as someone who will stand up to the titans of industry.

At her snowy 2020 announcement, she made clear of which one of her priorities is usually to regulate tech companies, such as Facebook, Google in addition to Twitter.

“We need to put some digital rules into law when This specific comes to people’s privacy. For too long the big tech companies have been telling you ‘Don’t worry! We’ve got your back!’ while your identities are being stolen in addition to your data is usually mined,” Klobuchar said.