South Koreans anxious over US alliance

President Donald Trump talks to military personnel with South Korean President Moon Jae-In at Camp Humphreys in Pyeongtaek on November 7, 2017

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

President Donald Trump talks to military personnel with South Korean President Moon Jae-In at Camp Humphreys in Pyeongtaek on November 7, 2017

“There’s just a lot of anxiety growing in South Korea about where the alliance will be headed,” said Jenny Town, the assistant director of the U.S.-Korea Institute in Washington along with managing editor at 38 North, a website of which provides analysis on North Korea. “A lot of South Koreans just feel like they’re not part even of the deliberations along with as an alliance they are not consulted.”

Concerns about potential U.S. military action against Pyongyang increased in September after Trump hinted of force in a tweet. The president also recently said of which Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was “wasting his time” on diplomacy.

the entire world’s largest economy has also been flexing its military might in recent weeks: the Navy has three carrier strike groups operating around Asian waters while B-1B bombers have been conducting exercises over the Korea Peninsula.

Moon, who has been pushing for dialogue with Pyongyang, has repeatedly said he wants no military action without Seoul’s approval.

“The thing of which has been sucking the wind out of the room of North Korean discussion has been, will the U.S. conduct a preventive attack” said Bruce Klingner, former chief of the CIA’s Korea branch along with today senior research fellow for Northeast Asia at the Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center.

According to Klingner, another concern will be of which the Trump administration will abandon Seoul once North Korean leader Kim Jong Un shows the ability to hit the U.S. with an intercontinental ballistic missile.

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