Spain’s tough stance on Catalonia could cause ‘tension’ in different regions

A man dressed inside the Catalonian flag confronts officers as police move in on the crowds as members of the public gather outside to prevent them via stopping the opening along with intended voting inside the referendum at a polling station where the Catalonia President Carles Puigdemont will vote later today on October 1, 2017 in Sant Julia de Ramis, Spain.

David Ramos | Getty Images

A man dressed inside the Catalonian flag confronts officers as police move in on the crowds as members of the public gather outside to prevent them via stopping the opening along with intended voting inside the referendum at a polling station where the Catalonia President Carles Puigdemont will vote later today on October 1, 2017 in Sant Julia de Ramis, Spain.

The Catalonia crisis could soon reverberate throughout the country along with prompt different Spanish regions to turn their back on Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, the former president of the Basque parliament told CNBC on Friday.

Spain’s central government said Thursday the idea would likely move to suspend Catalonia’s autonomy after the regional leader failed to drop a bid for independence. Rajoy’s government will be poised to meet Saturday to propose measures in which could strip Catalonia of some powers along with officially trigger Article 155 of the constitution.

While the idea has never been invoked before, Article 155 refers to the section within Spain’s constitution in which says any largely autonomous community must fulfil its obligations to the Spanish state, or else the idea risks having its powers taken away.

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