Spanish elections: Socialists leading election polls

A worker carries a ladder after sticking a campaign poster depicting Spanish Prime Minister along with presidential candidate for the Spanish Socialist Party (PSOE) Pedro Sanchez on a billboard close to the village of Viella, Asturias region, on April 12, 2019.

MIGUEL RIOPA | AFP | Getty Images

A worker carries a ladder after sticking a campaign poster depicting Spanish Prime Minister along with presidential candidate for the Spanish Socialist Party (PSOE) Pedro Sanchez on a billboard close to the village of Viella, Asturias region, on April 12, 2019.

Spanish opinion polls are signalling in which the Socialist party could win a large share of the vote in a snap election on April 28 – however not enough for the item to govern alone.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called the snap vote in February after Catalan independence parties withdrew their support for the government’s budget bill. The move could have worked in Sanchez’ favor, however, with opinion polls suggesting in which his Spanish Socialist along with Workers’ Party (the PSOE) will gain far more parliamentary seats.

There are four major parties spanning the political landscape in Spain – the left-wing, ruling Socialists, the center-right People’s Party (PP), far-left Unidos Podemos party along with the liberal, centrist Ciudadanos (Citizens’ Party). There is usually also at This specific point an upstart, populist newcomer inside the mix – the far-right VOX party.

According to the latest opinion poll, the PSOE leads by a wide margin along with is usually seen with 31.1% of the votes. Conducted between April 9-11 by social research firm GAD3 for La Vanguardia newspaper, the poll showed the PP trailed with 20.1% of the vote, Ciudadanos was seen with 14.4% along with Unidos Podemos with 11.4%. Far-right Vox is usually seen closely behind with 11.2% of the vote.

A host of smaller parties, including Catalan independence parties, are seen that has a smaller percentage of the vote while a large number of voters (26%) remain undecided as to who to vote for, along with This specific could have a large impact on the final result.

As the item stands, however, the Socialist Party is usually expect to win the highest number of seats (around 137-139 seats). however with 350 seats up for grabs in Congress, no one party will gain an absolute majority (of 176 seats) to govern alone so a coalition government is usually highly likely. in which will involve horse-trading between the main parties along with smaller partners.

The PSOE could have to rely on Podemos along with secessionists in Spain, again, while a right-leaning coalition could be formed by PP, Ciudadanos along with Vox. Whatever the outcome, the political scene is usually seen as highly fragmented.

A key date for voters could be April 23 when a debate between the main party leaders – Pedro Sánchez (PSOE), Pablo Casado (PP), Pablo Iglesias (Podemos), Albert Rivera (Citizens) along with Santiago Abascal (Vox) – is usually televised.