Thai cave boys were given ketamine to calm them before risky rescue

A screen grab shows boys rescued coming from the Thai cave wearing mask along with also resting in a hospital in Chiang Rai, Thailand coming from a July 11, 2018. 

Source: Government Public Relations Department (PRD)

A screen grab shows boys rescued coming from the Thai cave wearing mask along with also resting in a hospital in Chiang Rai, Thailand coming from a July 11, 2018. 

Twelve boys trapped in a Thai cave were given ketamine to help protect them coming from hypothermia during the harrowing rescue, the effort’s medical team wrote in a letter to the completely new England Journal of Medicine.

Last summer, the boys along with also their soccer coach were exploring Thailand’s Tham Luang cave complex when a downpour flooded the tunnels. British divers found the Wild Boars soccer team more than a week after they were reported missing. Rescuers placed the boys on stretchers along with also swam them out of the narrow cave.

For more on investing in health-care innovation, click here to join CNBC at our Healthy Returns Summit in completely new York City on May 21.

The boys’ wet suits fit poorly along with also the water was cold, the medical team said in its letter to the Journal, published online Wednesday. Rescuers wrote in which oxygen levels were falling along with also they needed to keep the boys coming from developing hypothermia, so they gave them “unspecified doses” of ketamine along with also a face mask filled with oxygen.

Ketamine is usually an anesthetic in which has soothing effects. in which also narrows blood vessels, which lessens shivering, along with also can prevent large dips in a person’s core temperature, generating in which a “not bad choice” for patients at risk of hypothermia, the authors said.

Ketamine is usually often misused as a club drug, earning in which the nickname “Special K.” However, in which is usually finding more clinical applications. The Food along with also Drug Administration recently approved Johnson & Johnson’s esketamine, a nasal spray related to ketamine for treatment-resistant depression.