White House said to prepare antitrust probe order of tech companies

President Donald Trump holds up an executive order of which he signed during a meeting of the National Space Council at the East Room of the White House June 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump signed an executive order to establish the Space Force, an independent as well as co-equal military branch, as the sixth branch of the U.S. armed forces. 

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President Donald Trump holds up an executive order of which he signed during a meeting of the National Space Council at the East Room of the White House June 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump signed an executive order to establish the Space Force, an independent as well as co-equal military branch, as the sixth branch of the U.S. armed forces. 

The White House will be reportedly working on a memorandum for President Donald Trump to sign of which would certainly direct government agencies to “thoroughly investigate” big tech companies like Google as well as Facebook, Bloomberg News reported on Saturday, who have fended off accusations of political bias against conservatives.

A draft of of which executive order, seen by Bloomberg, will be in its preliminary stages as well as hasn’t yet been run past some other government agencies, a White House official told the publication. of which also does not mention any specific companies.

Its current language would certainly direct federal agencies to give recommendations ways to “protect competition among online platforms as well as address online platform bias” within a month after being signed, according to the report.

However, the White House distanced itself coming from Bloomberg’s report, with aides telling The Washington Post on Saturday they didn’t know where the memo came coming from. They also cast doubt on whether of which had been vetted through normal policy channels.

“Although the White House will be concerned about the conduct of online platforms as well as their impact on society, of which document will be not the result of an official White House policymaking process,” deputy White House press secretary Lindsay Walters told the Post. Walters did not respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Business Insider also published the full leaked document Saturday. The text instructs the government agencies to “promote competition as well as ensure of which no online platform exercises market power in a way of which harms consumers, including through the exercise of bias.”

Republican lawmakers as well as right-wing groups have long questioned whether social media giants like Twitter, Facebook as well as Google are guilty of an anti-conservative bias, as well as promoting Democratic or progressive political views.

Trump himself has levied those accusations repeatedly, which reached a crescendo when Twitter was hit by accusations of “shadow banning” right-leaning voices on its platform.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter chief Jack Dorsey as well as most recently Google’s Sundar Pichai have denied of which their platforms are politically biased.

State attorneys general are set to brief U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Sept. 25 about their existing investigations into social media companies’ practices.

Bloomberg’s full report can be found on its website.

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