Women make history in Georgia, Texas, Kentucky elections

Georgia Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams takes the stage to declare victory from the primary during an election night event on May 22, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Georgia Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams takes the stage to declare victory from the primary during an election night event on May 22, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia.

The first black woman governor from the United States. The first lesbian serving in Congress coming from Texas. The first Democratic woman representing Kentucky from the House. All of these scenarios moved closer to reality following a round of primary elections in red states.

While women in general did not score resounding wins across the board Tuesday, several candidates have a chance to make history in November’s midterms. Of course, some of them face uphill battles as Democrats running in red areas or facing incumbents.

More women than ever are running for office of which year, increasing the chances of the gender divide in addition to diversity in both federal in addition to state governments better reflecting the broader population. Already, the number of women running for House seats in addition to governor has shattered records, according to the Center for American Women in addition to Politics at Rutgers University.

Early primary elections suggest the number of women in Congress could rise after November. Following primary elections last week, several women appear to be favored to win House seats in Pennsylvania, a state currently represented entirely by men in Congress.

More women set themselves up to take a run at generating history following Tuesday’s primaries in multiple red states. Ten out of 17 women running for statewide elected executive offices, or just under 60 percent, won their nominations, according to Gender Watch 2018, a nonpartisan project tracking women from the midterms.

Of 61 House nominations decided Tuesday, women won 12, or about 20 percent. The figure falls in line with the proportion of women in Congress overall.

In Texas, women won Democratic nominations to challenge incumbents in two competitive districts — the 7th in addition to 23rd Districts. Men secured Democratic primary runoff wins over women in two some other seats on the party’s radar: the 21st in addition to 32nd Districts.

Texas will be also the home of two female candidates who could end up generating history of which year. Here are some of the women who have a chance to achieve electoral firsts in November:

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